Tag Archives: regatta

KSC Catamaran Races (and monohull) Not-Regatta

The KSC Catamaran crew seemed lukewarm on the idea of a Cat Regatta like we traditionally run.  But some were still looking for an excuse to hit the water.

Jean stepped up and will be running a pair of races to and from Aylmer Marina on Saturday, Aug 19!

Those who did the 12-Mile Event this year will find the format familiar — these will be self-timed races between two points, so bring a stopwatch. You sail from a mark in front of KSC to a point on Aylmer beach, and time your run.  We’ll then break for lunch (and possibly a beer or two) at the marina.  A second race from the beach back to KSC will cap off the day.  Once we get back to KSC we’ll figure out the “adjusted times” of each boat for each race.

Points in the vein of Appendix A will be award, with the “total adjusted time” being the tie-breaker.

Monohulls are more than welcome to come join the fun, but this is our one “cat event” of the year, and only the multihulls will be scored.  I would ask that any monohulls sailing avoid enforcing their right-of-way if coming up to a cat to allow the cat to score her best possible time.

Our Principal Race Officer (PRO) Jean will hold a skipper’s meeting at the KSC beach at 10:45am and the first race sets off at 11:00.  We anticipate boats to arrive at Aylmer by about 11:45.  After enjoying a lunch, rig up, and start race #2 at about 1:30 (or whenever everyone is ready, at the PRO’s discretion) to arrive back at KSC by about 2:15.

Please send the Sailing Director (sailing@kanatasailingclub.com) an email so we know how many people to expect, along with your preference of boat (Hobie 16, Hobie 18, or one of the monohulls).  First choice will be given to those who reply to the Sailing Director first.

The ugly details (SIs)

What would a race be without ugly details laid out in Sailing Instructions?  These are not formal SIs, but should be enough to get us through the day.  The PRO will clarify any questions you may have about the race.

  1. Any of these instructions may be changed by the PRO at any time up to the end of the Skipper’s Meeting.
  2. The races will take place Saturday Aug 19
  3. Each boat shall track her own time for each race using a stopwatch or similar means.
  4. Times for each race shall be reported to the PRO after the 2nd race
  5. The 1st race shall be between a mark in front of the KSC clubhouse to a point on Aylmer Beach designated by the PRO.  The boat shall pass as close to the KSC mark as possible and start her time.  The boat shall finish when the crew disembarks from the boat at Aylmer Beach.
  6. The second race shall be between Aylmer Beach and a mark in front of KSC clubhouse.  The boat shall start her watch when she pushes off from Aylmer Beach (that is, when the crew are all aboard).  The boat shall sail as close as possible to the mark in front of KSC and stop her watch as she passes it.
  7. Crews shall disembark or push off as close to the Aylmer shore as is safe and practical.  Boats with crew disembarking or pushing off far out into the river may be penalized or disqualified at the PRO’s discretion if it is felt that they did so to try to reduce their time.
  8. RRS right-of-ways rules when racing.
  9. Boats should start as soon as is safe and practical after each other, and should not unduly delay their start in anticipation of changing winds or other conditions
  10. Anticipated timetable.
    1. There will be a Skipper’s Meeting at the KSC beach beginning at 10:45am
    2. The 1st race shall start at 11:00am or as close to that time as the PRO deems fit
    3. Arrival at Aylmer is anticipated at approximately 11:45.  Boats should pull up onto the beach and possibly lower sails to prevent flogging.
    4. Lunch (at the crew’s own expense) shall be at the Aylmer Marina
      1. Your Humble Sailing Director can’t make it that day, so have a beer for me 🙂
    5. The 2nd race shall take place after lunch at the PRO’s discretion, with the PRO giving boats time to rig up before the start.  A 1:30 start time is expected.
    6. Arrival back at KSC is expected by about 2:15.
  11. Scoring
    1. The SCHRS for Hobie 18 is 1.091.  The SCHRS for Hobie 16 is 1.193
    2. SCHRS numbers for any other class of multihull may be looked up online
    3. The Adjusted Time (AT) for each race/boat shall be the Elapsed Time divided by the SCHRS number for the boat
      1. AT = ET / SCHRS
      2. Examples:
        Hobie 18 Elapsed Time of 35:05
        AT = 35:05 / 1.091 = 32:09Hobie 16 ET of 36:23
        AT = 36:23 / 1.193 = 30:30

        The Hobie 16 would be the winner

    4. Each boat shall be awarded points according to the place it finished in for each race, based on Adjusted time.
      1. 1st place gets 1 point, 2nd place gets 2 points, etc
    5. The winner after all races shall be the boat with the lowest number of total points.
    6. If there are 2 boats with an equal number of total points, the tie shall be broken by comparing total Adjusted Times

KSC 12-Mile Island Event this Saturday, July 29, 2017

Each year, Kanata Sailing Club holds a “12-Mile Island” event as a long distance race.  We’ll be doing things a bit different this year, so please read on.

Where is 12-Mile Island?

The island, also called Ile Allen, is upriver (i.e. away from Ottawa) a good distance from KSC.  You sail North-West, past Pinhey’s Point, through the narrows at the Port-of-Call Marina, past Baskin’s Beach (both on the Ontario side), around the island, then back downriver to KSC.  Note that we recommend that you stay near the centre of the channel, especially when you’re sailing on the Quebec side of the island as it can get a bit shallow there.

How long does it take?

Depending on the wind conditions, and the type of boat you sail, a round trip journey generally takes the better part of a day.  The record, as far as I’m aware, is just over 2 hours (set in a fast catamaran, on a big-wind day, by ridiculously skilled and fast sailors).  On a more typical day, it’ll take 3+ hours in a cat, 4+ hours in an Albacore.  A light wind day could take 5 or more hours.

I don’t want to sail that far.

We have another option, and we’ll get to that.  Please keep reading.

How is it fair to people who sail slower boats?

We “handicap” the time.  There are generally accepted ratios as to how fast different boats sail.  The RYA (the UK equivalent of Sail Canada) maintains the handicaps for a bunch of boats.  According to their numbers for example, the Albacore is slightly faster than the Laser.  So, if a Laser can do a course in 60 minutes then it should take an Albacore 57 minutes and a Hobie 16 catamaran should be able to do it in 44 minutes.  We don’t consider the handicaps on our normal race nights, but will do so for this event.  The 2017 list of Portsmouth handicap numbers for monohulls can be found here and for cats here (we’ll be using the “PN Look-a-like” numbers for the cats).

Smaller numbers mean the boat should be theoretically be faster.

Okay, so let’s say I want to participate in the 12-Mile Island Event.  What’s the plan?

In previous year’s we’ve run the event as a “race” with a start line, and finish line, etc.  This year we’re doing things a bit differently since it’s really boring for a race committee to wait 4 hours for a boat to finish.

We’re setting a target finish time of 3:30pm.  You can start whenever you would like (be it 11:06am, 9:48am, noon, 1:21pm if you’re really optimistic, etc).  There will be a bouy in front of the sailing club to act as a starting/finishing point.  Sail from downriver, as close to the bouy as possible, to start your island rounding.  Record what time you started.  As you finish, pass the bouy as close as possible again and record your finish time.  Alternatively, you can use a stopwatch to track how long the run took you.

We’ll figure out an “adjusted time” based on your elapsed time and your boat’s handicap.

Once everyone is back at the club (target 3:30pm with a 4:15pm cut-off) we’ll crunch the numbers and see who did the rounding in the least amount of adjusted time.  Winners to be announced as soon as is practical after everyone is ashore.

As of July 25, the wind forecast is for moderate winds (maybe on the light side of moderate).  I would encourage monohull sailors to target a start time of around 11:00.  This would get you home right on time if the rounding takes you 4hr 30min.  Having a group of monohulls all leaving at the same time also allows you to keep an eye on each other.

What to I win?

Bragging rights, and a round of applause at the club’s AGM.  Also, this counts as one of the roundings for the 12-Mile Island Challenge and the trophies that go along with that.

12-Mile Island Challenge?  What’s that?

KSC founding members Harry Adderley and Ken Eaves have challenged the members of the club to round 12-Mile Island as many times as they can in a season.  There are trophies for those who complete:

  • the most roundings in a cat
  • the most roundings with a double-handed monohull
  • the most roundings with a single-handed monohull

If you round the island as part of this event, it counts towards your yearly total.  Note that in 2016, there were no single-handed monohull roundings, and only 2 (I think) double-handed roundings, so if you had done the 12-Mile Event in a Laser, you would have won.  On a tangential note, I had heard that Carla challenged Norm to round the island in an Opti, so we’ll see if that pans out.  Norm, I suggest you leave the club at 8:00am to make it back by 3:30.

I’m not ready to commit to that long a voyage.  Is there another option?

Yes!  I’ll be dropping a bouy in the middle of the river just past Pinhey’s Point.  This is about 1/2 way to 12-Mile Island.  We’ll actually announce two winners — the fastest time around the island, and the fastest time around the 1/2 way mark.  So, if you can’t get to the club until say 12:30, you might be able to grab a boat and do the half-run before the cut off.

I’m sold, how do I sign up?

Just show up at the club on Saturday July 29, rig your boat, and start your sail!  I aim to have the start mark in the water by 10:00, and the 1/2 mark shortly after.  As mentioned, aim to finish as close to 3:30, as possible, so everyone arrives back at the club around the same time.  Bring something to BBQ, a drink or two, and we’ll go through the results.  We’ll consider boats not finished by 4:15 disqualified.

Boats are first-come-first-serve.

Why the 4:15 cut off time?

This gives us time to crunch numbers, announce winners, and go out in the powerboat to pick up the half-way mark.  If we see any KSC boats struggling to make it back to the club, we’ll also give them a tow home, but please be advised that KSC should not be considered a rescue service.  Use your good judgement to take into account your sailing skills, experience, and weather conditions (both forecast and observed).

I don’t want to sail solo.  How can I find a skipper/crew?

Send me an email at sailing@kanatasailingclub.com if you’re looking for someone to sail with.  I’ll try to get people who email me in touch with each other.

 

2016 KSC Open Regatta

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It’s that time of the year again, Labour Day is approaching and (with it) the KSC Open Regatta!  Come one, come all to our club and test your skill against some of the Ottawa area’s best racers.

Albacore and Laser sailors can expect a great 2-day event with lots of fun and great people.  We are pleased to announce that this year’s prizes are beautiful beer mugs with club and class logos etched in (mug for first place Laser, and a mug each for skipper and crew of first place Albacore).

As always, sailors of other classes of boats are welcome to participate in fine racing (however will be ineligible for prizes).

A change over previous years is that a light lunch will be provided on the water for all participants who register before Saturday August 27!  So sign up now!

Details:

Date: Sept 3-4, 2016 (Sat/Sun Labour-day weekend)

Entry fee: Single-handed $25, Double-handed $35 (discount for classes with no prizes)

Notice of Race

Sailing Instructions